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2010-2011 world protests

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2010–2011 anti-government protests

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In late 2010 and in 2011, a series of major protests happened around the world. Protests were primarily concentrated in the Wikipedia:Arab World, leading to two revolutions and major governmental changes. Most protests were Wikipedia:populist and peaceful, with demonstrators calling for regime change, democracy, Wikipedia:human rights including Wikipedia:labor rights,[1][2][3] and government responses to inflation and soaring food prices and petroleum prices.

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In the Arab world, protests were generally for more democratic rights as well as other reasons. Protests were characterized by Wikipedia:self-immolations, large gatherings in public areas and general peaceful demonstrating.

In Wikipedia:Latin America, protests occurred in several countries. Grievances included governmental reform, which had been protested in recent past, but lacked any real action on the government's side.

An army vehicle that had been captured by protestors burns outside the presidential office building during citywide protests and riots in Bishkek on April 7

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[edit] Middle East and North Africa protests

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Large protests led to the presidents of Wikipedia:Tunisia and Egypt (WP) losing their presidencies.

[edit] Europe

[edit] Albania


On January 26, Wikipedia:Edi Rama, the Mayor of Wikipedia:Tirana, Albania, called for protests against Prime Minister Wikipedia:Sali Berisha's government. The demonstrators were dispersed by Wikipedia:tear gas and Wikipedia:water cannons. Four protesters were killed, and over 150 were injured. The protest was called an attempt to foment similar unrest as in Tunisia.

[edit] Italy

On February 13, protests were held in Rome. The protesters wanted the ousting of Prime Minister Wikipedia:Silvio Berlusconi because of his latest sex-scandal Wikipedia:Rubygate.

[edit] Asia

[edit] Bangladesh

A general strike was called in Wikipedia:Bangladesh; it was seen as partly inspired by events in Egypt.[4]

[edit] Iran

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The 32nd anniversary of the Wikipedia:Iranian Revolution was said to have had a low turnout on 11 February 2011. (The state-run Wikipedia:Kayhan newspaper claimed a 50 million turnout, despite Iran having a population of only 75 million.) At the behest of Wikipedia:Mir-Hossein Mousavi and Wikipedia:Mehdi Karroubi, opposition leaders called for nationwide protest marches for 14 February. Rumours suggested that the protesters would include university students, lorry drivers and gold merchants from across the country under the umbrella opposition known as the Green movement in what was seen as an inspiration of events from Egypt and Tunisia. The Revolutionary Guard said it would forcefully confront protesters.[5] Opposition activists and aides to Mousavi and Karroubi had been arrested in the days before the protests.

The opposition protesters used a similar tactic from the 2009 protests in which they chanted "Wikipedia:Allahu Akbar" and "Death to the dictator" into the early morning hours. However, rather than using slogans praising Mousavi like in 2009, protestors have been widely chanting "Mubarak, Ben Ali, Now its time for Seyed Ali [Khamenei]". Reports from the demonstrations of 14 February describe clashes between protesters and security forces in Wikipedia:Tehran, where 10,000 security forces had been deployed to prevent protesters from gathering at Azadi Square, where the marches, originating from Enghelab, Azadi and Vali-Asr streets, were expected to converge. Police reportedly fired tear gas and used pepper spray and batons to disperse protesters. Clashes were also reported in Wikipedia:Isfahan.[6] It was reported up to a third of a million protesters marched in Tehran alone on February 14.[7]

[edit] Kyrgyzstan


[edit] South America

[edit] Bolivia

On February 10, President Evo Morales (WP) cancelled an appearance at a public event in Oruro due to fears over riots after protesters angry about rising food prices and Morales' style of government reportedly planted explosives there. Latin American (WP) leaders were "on guard" in the wake of the Tunisian and Egyptian uprisings, according to Wikipedia:United Press International[8] Protests against the president were also reported in several of the country's major cities.[9]

[edit] Chile


[edit] Venezuela

See also: Wikipedia:Human rights in Venezuela and Wikipedia:Franklin Brito

A series of hunger strikes (WP) occurred protesting the government of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez (WP). Hunger strike protests had occurred before, including by the mayor of Caracas (WP), Mayor Wikipedia:Antonio Ledezma in 2009.[10] Farmers, students and others went on hunger strikes.[11][12] The strikes have led to at least two deaths.[13]

[edit] Africa

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[edit] Cote d'Ivoire


[edit] Gabon

On January 29, riot police in Wikipedia:Gabon fired Wikipedia:tear gas to break up a protest by around 5,000 opposition supporters, where according to witnesses, up to 20 people were wounded. It was the second such protest since opposition leader Wikipedia:Andre Mba Obame declared himself president on January 25 and urged people to take inspiration from Tunisia's uprising.[14] Obame subsequently hid out in the local Wikipedia:United Nations Development Programme office, while President Bongo shut down TV stations and allegedly kidnapped members of the opposition. The UN is accusing Gabon's police of invading and beating students within the university. Although initial protests overwhelmingly consisted of opposition loyalists, the unrest appears to be developing into a wider social conflict, with students leading the protests.[15]

[edit] Senegal

Bocar Bocoum, a former soldier set himself on fire in front of the official residence of President Wikipedia:Abdoulaye Wade, reportedly out of demands for compensation for military injuries.[16] In 2008, a similar protest occurred with a man setting himself on fire in front of the Presidential residence as well.[17]

[edit] References

  1. Niquette, Mark (2011-02-18). "Public Worker Protests Spread From Wisconsin to Ohio". Wikipedia:Bloomberg. Archived from the original on 2011-02-18. http://www.webcitation.org/5wb13xKZL. Retrieved 2011-02-18.</li>
  2. Camia, Catalina (2011-02-17). "Rep. Paul Ryan compares Wisconsin protests to Cairo". Wikipedia:USA Today. Archived from the original on 2011-02-18. http://www.webcitation.org/5wb2wPvMS. Retrieved 2011-02-18.</li>
  3. Lux, Mike (2011-02-18). "Egypt, Wisconsin, and the Future of Our Democracy". Wikipedia:Huffington Post. Archived from the original on 2011-02-18. http://www.webcitation.org/5wb3qn1tG. Retrieved 2011-02-18.</li>
  4. Egyptian aftershock felt most by Israel. Wikipedia:Mail & Guardian Online. Archived from source 2011-02-18. URL accessed on 2011-02-13.</li>
  5. D. Parvaz. Iran opposition 'planning protests' - Middle East. Al Jazeera English. URL accessed on 2011-02-13.</li>
  6. Al Jazeera English. Clashes reported in Iran protests. Al Jazeera English. URL accessed on 2011-02-14.</li>
  7. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/tehranbureau/2011/02/iran-live-blog-25-bahman-14-february.html</li>
  8. Morales aborts visit amid fears of food riots. UPI.com. URL accessed on 2011-02-13.</li>
  9. Wikipedia:The Associated Press. Bolivian president rattled by protests. The Herald - Rock Hill, SC. URL accessed on 2011-02-13.</li>
  10. Mayor ends hunger strike against Venezuelan president July 8, 2009 Wikipedia:CNN</li>
  11. Venezuela's top diplomat downplays hunger strike Wikipedia:Associated Press 2011-02-17 </li>
  12. AFP US urges Venezuela to let OAS visit hunger-strikers 18 Feb 2011</li>
  13. Wikipedia:CNN Venezuelan hunger striker dies August 31, 2010</li>
  14. "Police use tear gas to break up Gabon protest". Reuters Africa. 30 January 2011. http://af.reuters.com/article/topNews/idAFJOE70T00R20110130. Retrieved 8 February 2011.</li>
  15. "Now that Egypt's Mubarak is out, could Gabon's Bongo be next?". CS Monitor. http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Africa/Africa-Monitor/2011/0212/Now-that-Egypt-s-Mubarak-is-out-could-Gabon-s-Bongo-be-next. Retrieved 15 February 2011.</li>
  16. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/18/AR2011021801835.html</li>
  17. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-12508334</li></ol>
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